What’s in an Opinion?

It’s natural to have different opinions about different things in life. All have the right to have opinions but only some are right.

An opinion can delight the speaker but can hurt the audience. An opinion may appear to be the present reality but its consequence is far reaching. For opinions to be constructive, one has to learn the art of “agreeing to disagree”. Opinions cease to be constructive when these take the form of judgments.

“It seems like it’s going to rain. Let’s get an umbrella”, one said. “No! It seems like it’s going to be a heavy rain. Let’s jump into the cafe and grab a hot coffee”, said another. And there were opinions and counter-opinions. By that time, it rained and they got drenched! Had they learned to agree to disagree, they would have escaped the rain.

The Scripture advises: Don’t pick on people, jump on their failures, criticize their faults— unless, of course, you want the same treatment! It also exhorts: accept each other.

Bitterness produces an air of judgment, but love produces an atmosphere of acceptance. Those who apply love spread its sweet smell wherever they go.

Creating a culture of self-discipline breaks the faultfinding mindset. That’s what the following statement states: First get rid of the log in your own eye; then you will see well enough to deal with the speck in your friend’s eye.

Self-discipline births honor. It acknowledges the worth of those heaven-ordained authorities in family, education, work place, government and church. Even when taking a stand against unjust practices and unscriptural principles, self-discipline stands on respect.

Opinions cannot be terminated but can be transformed. When opinions give way to mutual acceptance, peace takes the stage!

Matthew 7:1, Romans 15:7, Matthew 7:5, Daniel 3:16-18

– – – written by Joe Abraham & Ancy Joe