Man\'s Search for Ultimate Meaning

The book, Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning by Viktor E. Frankl, having nine essays comprise a kind of sequel to the author’s foundation work of “logotherapy” – Man’s Search for Meaning, with a focus on a person’s spiritual rather than existential striving.

Theme :

Frankl offers listeners a straightforward alternative to traditional Freudian psychoanalysis as MAN’S SEARCH FOR ULTIMATE MEANING explores the sometimes unconscious basic human desire for inspiration or revelation, and illustrates how life can offer profound meaning at every turn.

The following nine essays comprise a sequel to ‘Man’s Search for Meaning’.

Table of Contents:-
Ch. 1 The Essence of Existential Analysis 25
Ch. 2 The Spiritual Unconscious 31
Ch. 3 Existential Analysis of Conscience 39
Ch. 4 Existential Analysis of Dreams 47
Ch. 5 The Transcendent Quality of Conscience 59
Ch. 6 Unconscious Religiousness 67
Ch. 7 Psychotherapy and Theology 77
Ch. 8 New Research in Logotherapy circa 1975 83
Ch. 9 Man’s Search for Ultimate Meaning 137

Reviews :

Henry Charrier was the man who made the first move to change things in my mind, so in my life with his book “Butterfly”. Then, Frankl came up just to make me jump into a deep anxiety and depression but then took me out into a calm place brightened by sunlight inwhich i could see my past and self-created future… – John Sebastian

Although I didn’t connect with the first 50 or so pages of this book, after that I was challenged and inspired by Frankl. His concerns, the “existential vacuum”, the depressing impact of an “indoctrination into reductionism”, the irreducibility of our experience, “responsibility as the essence of existence”, these are well worth being reminded of. – Lito Thomas

About the Author : Viktor E. Frankl (1905 – 1997)

Viktor E. Frankl developed the revolutionary approach to psychotherapy known as logotherapy, founded on the belief that humanity’s primary motivational force is the search for meaning. One of the great psychotherapists of this century, he was head of the neurological department of the Vienna Polyclinic Hospital for twenty-five years and is the author of thirty-one works on philosophy, psychotherapy, and neurology, including the classic Man’s Search for Meaning.